Why less lethal?

Why less lethal?

Why less lethal? This a question asked by many, but consider the following. Above is a graph used by many law enforcement and security professionals when learning about use of force options and levels. Deadly force should always be a last resort. In many instances a firm and confident voice and posture will be enough to deescalate a potentially hazardous and violent situation. But when this fails "soft techniques" and "hard techniques" may be suitable to hinder further aggression and violence. Tools such as pepper spray and kubatons can be used in a less harmful manner in order to force compliance and stop an unwanted action. If this approach fails the next level of force may be warranted and authorized prior to the final stage of lethal use of force. Tools and weapons such as impact launchers both in compressed air format and pyrotechnic discharge can be enough to stop attackers and violent aggressors. In many parts of America and throughout...
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Kubotans

Kubotans

These weapons are usually constructed of metal alloy, wood, or polymer composite. They can be used as a last ditch self defense platform used to strike and manipulate pressure points of assailants. They can have pointed, rounded, or flat tips. Many of them can be carried unassumingly on a keychain and outfitted with a lanyard. The ideal target zones in self defense include bony, fleshy and sensitive parts such as knuckles, forearms, the bridge of the nose, shins, stomach, solar plexus, spine, temple, ribs, groin, neck and eyes. The kubotan was developed by Sōke Takayuki Kubota in the late 1960's and first adopted by the LAPD in the 1970's as a less lethal tool utilized by female officers. Since that time most law enforcement agencies have dropped the kubotan and picked up the telescopic or tactical baton as a less lethal striking weapon. However, many consumers still carry the kubotan as a self defense option due to it's light weight and ease...
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